The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

The Alaunt from the very beginning

Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby Gun on 1. December 2014, 04:50

freed wrote:
Gun wrote:Their "horse stopping lebrels" perhaps like this-
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This one looks stunning. Although I guess you need a lot of them to stop a horse.

Not really. In fact there would be no point in having more than two as they'd just get in eachother's way otherwise and have no where to hold, and I'd expect one good example to singlehandedly be able to catch a horse.

Size isn't everything, in fact it seems the bigger the prey animal the less big a dog can afford to be. Bull catching dogs are smaller again. While boar dogs can afford to be a lot larger, and the biggest dogs of all it seems were used to catch men, often being over 150 lbs. A horse is somewhere between a deer and bull on the scale of things, and unsurprisingly somewhere between the dogs suited to catching those animals is where you'll find a good horse tackling dog.

Keep in mind the dog I posted is not actually a horse tackling dog nor recently descended from any such dog, it's just my perception that it's of the right type and build. Realistically it's no doubt a lot MORE impressive than the average horse catching dog from the past. There was no need for them to be that beautiful. These are dogs in australia which do recently descend down from feral horse catching dogs largely unchanged-
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These are boar catching dogs, but their recent ancestors were horse catching dogs and the same animal, so I actually suspect these dogs are probably most like what horse catching dogs would have been like. Be it those of the conquistadors or the romans or in the civil war or whatever.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby da pink on 1. December 2014, 13:45

Gun wrote:Actually the middle dog is british, was trying to not be too aussie biased.
Obviously I do love aussie dogs but honestly I get just as excited by other dog scenes around the world that follow the same principles. The british lurcher scene being one such example. Historically such working dog cultures were the norm.



We still have good lurchers, but with the way the law's changed already, I can see our heritage of hunting dogs (and they've always been lurchers and terriers, and very common round my part of the country) slowly going the way of the Staffy etc

(and the day ain't dawned when an Aussie isn't Aussie biased ;) )
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby da pink on 1. December 2014, 13:51

Matt Livingston wrote:Yes Da Pink. That looks like our Brindle Bull It's not so much of lurcher type and broader through the chest, but still athletic and probably capable of running well. I'm like Gun I like dogs from all over and of different types so long as they can function. I'am admittedly partial to the OWE and BB. But that's because their lineage is like my own with roots from working,fighting,and war dogs from every nation that settled in the South Eastern U.S as well as the Carolina dogs added so they could handle the heat. The dogs here are almost as Creole as I 'am. But I really like the Bull lurcher types of Britain and Australia. Because they are the midway between my 2 favorite type of dogs and have a balance of speed and power. Just like in vehicles I prefer pick ups or sports cars although I wouldn't want a hybrid of those. Well I have owned a lowrider pick up w Pink and Grey Gradient paint job but that's beside the point. lol



You'll always feel a kinship with dogs from your area. The dog I posted is a recreation, and I have no idea as to if it can work. . . but certainly looks so, if the temperament is right.

I love the Aussie dogs, just so rough 'n' ready and always seem to have that bit of EBT (my favourite breed) showing through.

(we won't mention your low rider...but I get ya, I have bikes for speed and a pick up for, um, driving round in. Sold my sports car to buy it and don't regret it. It's not pink though)
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby Matt Livingston on 2. December 2014, 01:17

Yes Freed some do,especially in areas like mine where the White English have more presa type influence. See in rural areas these dogs are much more like types than breeds. Lots of people breed brindle bulls in to White English lines when there is to much white on them. Nobody wants a deaf dog. Also White English are Bred to Brindles with no white, the theory is if there's to much color on the dog It will be too hot in temperament. We all know this is not necessarily true but tradition rules.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby Matt Livingston on 2. December 2014, 01:35

Da Pink I like those Bull Arabs they show a lot EBT that's a breed I have always been curious about as they are not common here the only bull and terrier type around are Pit bulls. I've always heard the EBT was more man aggressive than dog aggressive. So do they make good guard dogs? I think they have an impressive look, of course I would like to see one a little longer in the leg.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby da pink on 2. December 2014, 15:14

I suppose they are slightly less amenable, or at least slower to make friends, than a SBT, but they are still very affectionate, personable dogs. I wouldn't say they are particularly more man aggressive than any other breed. Mine was the best dog I ever had. . . . and not too short in the legs! She'd show no aggression to other dogs, but would take no shit at all, and could back it up.

Great dogs. I even love the big egg headed short legged "show" type, but you can find more athletic examples if you shop around.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby da pink on 2. December 2014, 15:20

To me this is a great looking EBT,

Image
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby freed on 2. December 2014, 16:03

Matt Livingston wrote: I've always heard the EBT was more man aggressive than dog aggressive. So do they make good guard dogs? I think they have an impressive look, of course I would like to see one a little longer in the leg.


I have always heard that especially in some crosses they make very good guard dogs.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby da pink on 2. December 2014, 16:45

I think it's less outright aggression, but rather they're very protective of their family
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby Gun on 2. December 2014, 21:55

They're still pretty human friendly on the whole, in my experience, but just no where near as submissive and "melt in your hands" as a pitbull or sbt. Just more cocky and hard headed with people, hard to discipline. Like a pitbull will have it's heart broken if you get angry at it but an ebt will just keep smiling and if you punch it in the head it will just think you're playing a game and start trying to catch your fists in it's mouth, Lol (hypothetically, I'm not going around raining punches on ebts). They're not intimidated or submissive to strangers, but not necessarily unfriendly either.

I think it would help produce a better guard dog than an apbt, because there is less counter-productive stuff, but still it should probably be crossed to a more guardy type to get a real guard dog. I don't consider the ebt some super suspicious natural guard dog. I had a dog that was largely ebt with some boxer and old english sheepdog(weird I know) and it was a super guard dog, backed itself in a fight with any man (except my dad) and wanted to test it's mettle any chance it got, and also actively guarded the property. I think the guardian nature of it, funnily enough, actually came from the old english sheepdog, but the ebt is what made it a true fighter of men, and the ebt blood in no way hindered the guardian nature of the OES like apbt may have.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby Matt Livingston on 3. December 2014, 01:30

I know what you mean GUN the 3 breeds in the that dog would only compliment each other. I think the OES and Boxer would add sense and athleticism as well as protective instinct and like you said the EBT would give it the hardware. To produce a dog like that with a Pit would be harder but not impossible. You would really have to shop around. I don't know about other places but here a lot of Pit men produce substandard dogs by pit standards because they show defensive drive and some man aggression. All because some the lines they use are not fighting lines originally, but farm dogs. They usually kill them unless somebody wants it, then they wouldn't ever tell anybody it came from their stock. Those Pits have a temperament like you described in the EBT.

By the way that's not the strangest mix I've heard of try a Rottweiler and Cocker Spaniel. A friend of mine owned one. It sounds ugly, but was actually a nice looking compact dog.
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Re: The Alaunt (A type, not a breed)

Postby sunnyAK on 9. August 2017, 01:18

1911 W. Gilbey THE ALAUNTE
Image
I hope "bild.me" is not like "stupid photobucket" and won´t one day start deleting all pics, but as we never know, here the text again without the orginal print.
These dogs, it is thought, were of Caucasian origin.
They were used for warlike purposes, and, in the days
when bear and boar were hunted were employed to
grapple with those animals. \\'hether they were used
for the pursuit of deer is at least doubtful
Three kinds were recognised: the " Alaunte gentle,"
the "hunting Alaunte" and the "Alaunte of the
butcheries." The hunting variety was shaped like a
greyhound, but was of heavier build ; the head was
large and short, the eye small and the jaw square ; the
ears were trimmed and pointed ; in colour it was white,
grey or blackish. The dog wdiich, on a white coat, had
black markings near the head and above the tail was
most liked
The Alaunte of the butcheries was a drover's dog, and
was used with cattle ; it was also employed for bull- and
bear-baiting
The Alaunte was prone to attack domestic animals.
The Master of Game says :
" It is better shaped and
stronger for harm than any other beast," but it was
treacherous and foolish and "of evil understanding."
A good hunting Alaunte would run as fast as a greyhound,
and would "catch and hold." Mr. Baillie
Grohman, in his edition of The Master oj Game, suggests
that this dog was very like the German boarhound. It
may have been the dog from which the German
boarhound is descended.
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